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University of Utah Department of Anthropology

Anthropology is the comparative, evolutionary and historical study of humankind. Our department takes a theoretically driven, empirically-informed approach to this study, and has special expertise in archaeology, genetics, behavioral ecology, demography. Our regional expertise is strongest in Africa, Australia, New Guinea, Latin America and western North America. We have a small but influential faculty, three of whom (Harpending, Hawkes, O'Connell) are members of the National Academy of Sciences. Many faculty members do research that crosses disciplinary and sub-disciplinary lines, and we encourage students to do the same.

 

News              

                                         

                                                                                        

Monkeys_Small Hurry! Hurry!  This course is filling up fast !

                                            PRIMATOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL SUMMER 2014

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2014 Annual Leigh Lecture Presented by Professor Marianna Di Paolo, Ph.D.

The Shoshoni Language: From Oral Tradition to the Digital Age

Date: Wednesday, April 2, 2014
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Swaner Forum Lecture Hall, Natural History Museum of Utah
Address: 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology
Admission is Free

For more information or to download a PDF flier,  click here>>

 


Professor Dennis O’Rourke publishes a perspective on the Bering land bridge and the peopling of the Americas in Science

dOrourkeGenetic and environmental evidence indicates that after the ancestors of Native Americans left Asia, once linked Siberia and Alaska. Archaeological evidence is lacking because it drowned beneath the Bering Sea when sea levels rose.

University of Utah anthropologist Dennis O’Rourke and two colleagues make that argument in the Friday, Feb. 28, issue of the journal Science. They seek to reconcile existing genetic and paleoenvironmental evidence for human habitation on the Bering land bridge – also called Beringia – with an absence of archaeological evidence.

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